Head Dumpage

Welcome to my mental junk yard

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WEREWOLVES.

I forgot the teenage were wolves on television tonight.

I’m so sorry, my TW rant buddy! That’s what, 5 episodes so far that I forgot were on????

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I’m writing a fanfic for the first time in years, and I really think I’ll be able to finish it (I have a history of not finishing tics so I’m hoping this time will be different!).

It a post Cubia fic for the .hack//G.U. trilogy…It will be a three part series with lots of little side stories, so I’m really excited. It’s also helpful to get me back into the mindset of actual story creation, which is going to be a huge aspect of my senior project at school…

I can’t post any of it now, as that always seems to kill the drive to continue it, perhaps due to complacency, but I’ve reached just over 7k words. 

If only my fingers didn’t hurt so much… >.<

Wish me luck!

Filed under dothack G.U. .hack fanfiction writing is a painful but thrillign activity right now...hahaha

2,649 notes

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go
Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.
Fact submitted by: can-thandlethisweird

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

Fact submitted by: can-thandlethisweird

(via psych-facts)

277 notes

comicsalliance:

‘ANGELA: ASGARD’S ASSASSIN’ CREATORS ON THE SCARIEST WOMAN IN THE GALAXY [INTERVIEW]
By Andy Khouri
Created in the early ’90s by Todd McFarlane and Neil Gaiman in the pages of Image Comics’ Spawn, Angela is a supremely violent immortal warrior/hunter/angel/naked woman, sent to Earth to slay Hellspawn as a soldier in the war between Heaven and Hell.
Or at least, she was. As a consequence of litigation whose transcript word counts are in excess of every Marvel comic ever published in history (not really), Angela is now something and and perhaps someone else. Who that is remains a question — an unexpectedly compelling question. Indeed, some longtime comics fans were bemused by Marvel’s heavily promoted induction of a character created not just with another comic book publisher, but by McFarlane himself, one of Marvel’s most famous creative “defectors.” Not to mention the fact that in the character’s entire history, she’d appeared in just a handful of comics, only four of which by written by Gaiman, and the last of those came out 20 years ago.
That readers were meant to accept the stated importance of Angela on little more than Marvel’s marketing say so seemed like a tough sell, but the twists kept coming. She became a surprisingly major part of Brian Michael Bendis’ Guardians of the Galaxy cast. A half-naked angel running around in space with a talking raccoon, yes, but somehow it worked. It was later revealed that Angela’s the daughter of Odin and sister to Thor, and was just heretofore unseen while she lived in a distant realm (that we like to call the McFarlaverse). And that works, too.
Now Marvel is committing fully to Angela with the character’s first ongoing series, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, which comes with yet more surprises. It’s a solo title starring a female lead, which of course is still rare in American superhero comics, and it’s also drawn by Phil Jimenez, whose long association with certain amazon princesses and other distinctly powerful women characters sends a very loud and clear message about Marvel’s intentions for Angela.
Joining Jimenez is writer Kieron Gillen, himself one of Marvle’s most acclaimed Asgardian scholars, if you will, having done very well regarded runs on Journey Into Mystery and Thor. Also writing Angela is Marguerite Bennett, who’s penned numerous books for DC and other publishers, but who this year landed two ongoings in the form of Angela and the recently announced Sleepy Hollow. As part of the book’s unique “stories-within-stories” structure that you’ll read about below, Bennett will collaborate with noted cover artist and illustrator Stephanie Hans, who’s making a relatively rare visit to the realm of sequential storytelling to help make Angela that much more distinct.
ComicsAlliance spoke with all four creators and series editor Wil Moss about the endlessly impressive surprise that is Angela.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

‘ANGELA: ASGARD’S ASSASSIN’ CREATORS ON THE SCARIEST WOMAN IN THE GALAXY [INTERVIEW]

By Andy Khouri

Created in the early ’90s by Todd McFarlane and Neil Gaiman in the pages of Image Comics’ Spawn, Angela is a supremely violent immortal warrior/hunter/angel/naked woman, sent to Earth to slay Hellspawn as a soldier in the war between Heaven and Hell.

Or at least, she was. As a consequence of litigation whose transcript word counts are in excess of every Marvel comic ever published in history (not really), Angela is now something and and perhaps someone else. Who that is remains a question — an unexpectedly compelling question. Indeed, some longtime comics fans were bemused by Marvel’s heavily promoted induction of a character created not just with another comic book publisher, but by McFarlane himself, one of Marvel’s most famous creative “defectors.” Not to mention the fact that in the character’s entire history, she’d appeared in just a handful of comics, only four of which by written by Gaiman, and the last of those came out 20 years ago.

That readers were meant to accept the stated importance of Angela on little more than Marvel’s marketing say so seemed like a tough sell, but the twists kept coming. She became a surprisingly major part of Brian Michael Bendis’ Guardians of the Galaxy cast. A half-naked angel running around in space with a talking raccoon, yes, but somehow it worked. It was later revealed that Angela’s the daughter of Odin and sister to Thor, and was just heretofore unseen while she lived in a distant realm (that we like to call the McFarlaverse). And that works, too.

Now Marvel is committing fully to Angela with the character’s first ongoing series, Angela: Asgard’s Assassin, which comes with yet more surprises. It’s a solo title starring a female lead, which of course is still rare in American superhero comics, and it’s also drawn by Phil Jimenez, whose long association with certain amazon princesses and other distinctly powerful women characters sends a very loud and clear message about Marvel’s intentions for Angela.

Joining Jimenez is writer Kieron Gillen, himself one of Marvle’s most acclaimed Asgardian scholars, if you will, having done very well regarded runs on Journey Into Mystery and Thor. Also writing Angela is Marguerite Bennett, who’s penned numerous books for DC and other publishers, but who this year landed two ongoings in the form of Angela and the recently announced Sleepy Hollow. As part of the book’s unique “stories-within-stories” structure that you’ll read about below, Bennett will collaborate with noted cover artist and illustrator Stephanie Hans, who’s making a relatively rare visit to the realm of sequential storytelling to help make Angela that much more distinct.

ComicsAlliance spoke with all four creators and series editor Wil Moss about the endlessly impressive surprise that is Angela.

READ MORE

Filed under comics angela asgar's assassin marvel

11,220 notes

Assassin's Creed Unity:
*no playable female Assassins*
Male gamers:
This is just fine, so shut up! What's important isn't the character's gender, it's the story they are in! Who cares about the characters' genders? Stop trying to ruin other people's fun!
Hyrule Warriors:
*10 playable characters, 8 of them are women*
Male gamers:
WHAT THE HELL IS THIS?!?! There are too many girls in this game! What about us, the male fans? Why the female fans have more options? Women aren't interesting, if you don't include more men in the game then the story will become boring!

Filed under gaming

67,506 notes

cindymayweather:

"One fun fact I learned while on the air with Keith Olbermann was that humans on the Internet are scumbags. People say children are cruel, but I was never made fun of as a child or an adult. Suddenly, my disability on the world wide web is fair game. I would look at clips online and see comments like, "Yo, why’s she tweakin?" "Yo, is she retarded?" And my favorite, "Poor Gumby-mouth terrorist. What does she suffer from? We should really pray for her." One commenter even suggested that I add my disability to my credits: screenwriter, comedian, palsy."

Maysoon Zayid on TEDWomen (x)

(via unimaginableunimaginable)